Reviews of Homeward Bound

“3.5 out of 4 stars” - People Magazine                                                               “The brilliance of Emily Matchar’s new book is that it exhaustively describes what disillusioned workers are opting into: a slower, more sustainable, and more self-sufficient lifestyle that’s focused on the home. Matchar synthesizes dozens of trend stories … into a single, compelling narrative about the resurgence of domesticity….Refreshing.” -The New Republic                                                       "[P]rovocatively explores what the movement says about the role of women in society today.” – The New Yorker                                                                       "I unreservedly loved it…It’s empathetic and funny and thoughtful and smart, and I encourage all of you to read it."– The Hairpin                                                         “Cogently argues that choosing a more hands-on, DIY lifestyle – family farming, canning, crafting, can, without sacrificing feminism’s hard-won gains, improve on an earlier time when ‘people lived more lightly on the earth and relied less on corporations, and family and community came first.’” - ELLE                                                               “[I]ntelligent and insightful...essential reading.” - Christianity Today                                                       “A lively and perceptive reporter… a valuable and astute assessment.”—Publishers Weekly                                                         “A well-researched look at the resurgence of home life…. Offers intriguing insight into the renaissance of old-fashioned home traditions.”— Kirkus Reviews

What is New Domesticity?

This blog is a look at the social movement I call ‘New Domesticity’ – the fascination with reviving “lost” domestic arts like canning, bread-baking, knitting, chicken-raising, etc. Why are women of my generation, the daughters of post-Betty Friedan feminists, embracing the domestic tasks that our mothers and grandmothers so eagerly shrugged off? Why has the image of the blissfully domestic supermom overtaken the Sex & the City-style single urban careerist as the media’s feminine ideal? Where does this movement come from? What does it mean for women? For families? For society?                                                                                     My book, Homeward Bound: Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity, which explores New Domesticity in greater depth, will be published by Simon & Schuster in May 2013.

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Book giveaway!

I’m heading back to Hong Kong on Monday, and I have a box of Homeward Bound copies that simply won’t fit in the overhead bin. So: I’m going to give away a number of copies to bloggers interested in reviewing or otherwise writing about the book. How to get a copy? Write a comment [...]

Homeward Bound on Colbert Report!

Crazy…

Good Morning America appearance!

Click here to watch. It’s right after the thrilling segment on Moon Shoes (of which I had a pair, circa 1989), at about 41:40. The short segment focuses mostly on stay-at-home-mom-dom (which is only a small portion of my book) and doesn’t get into any of my critiques, but, hey, it’s [...]

Etsy responds to Homeward Bound

I dedicate a chapter in Homeward Bound to looking at the rise of the indie craft movement, and the new “artisan economy” of people starting micro businesses to sell things they hand-make at home – scarves, cupcakes, jewelry, etc. Part of this includes a hard look at Etsy, the online craft-selling platform. After attending [...]

The obsession with the all-natural pregnancy

The always-smart Annie Murphy Paul gives a fairly scathing review to Jennifer Margulis’s new book “The Business of Baby” in the New York Times this week. The book aims to root out what’s wrong with the American way of pregnancy and birth: too many C-sections, too many drugs, condescending OBs, a money-hungry medical system. [...]

Homeward Bound in Newsweek/The Daily Beast

image via brooklyn homesteader

In Newsweek/The Daily Beast, Michelle Goldberg writes about Homeward Bound, lifestyle bloggers and crafty hipsters:

It’s easy to mock the twee, hyperlocal, handmade aesthetic that dominates fashionable enclaves in places like Brooklyn and Portland, Oregon. But in her new book, Homeward Bound: Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity, [...]

Lovely early reviews for Homeward Bound in The New Yorker, Elle and others

“The brilliance of Emily Matchar’s new book is that it exhaustively describes what disillusioned workers are opting into: a slower, more sustainable, and more self-sufficient lifestyle that’s focused on the home. Matchar synthesizes dozens of trend stories … into a single, compelling narrative about the resurgence of domesticity….Refreshing.”  -The New Republic “Matchar researches the trend of [...]

“Culinary nostalgia, like any nostalgia, is borne of romance and distortion”

 

image via Oxford American

While we’re on the topic of over-romanticizing food and cooking, here’s a brilliant piece from Courtney Balestier in the Oxford American, on the pleasures and perils of our current foodie nostalgia:

Perhaps the appeal, to us twenty- and thirty-somethings going about life like it’s one long home-ec [...]

Homeward Bound excerpt on Salon

In Salon today, an excerpt from Homeward Bound, from the chapter titled “Cupcake Feminists, Hipster Jam Canners, and “Femivores”: The New DIY Food Culture.”

In this excerpt, I talk about the sudden rise of interest in stuff like jam-canning and chicken-keeping among young, educated people, look at the perils of foodie nostalgia (was [...]

Should we feel like failures for leaving the workforce?

Interesting read of the day: Noah Berlatsky’s defense of quitting your job in The Atlantic. Berlatsky, himself a grad school dropout turned writer, suggests that perhaps we need to stop talking about women leaving the workplace as a “failure,” and instead embrace everyone’s right to put family over work. As he writes:

I [...]